DOBROMYL CASTLE

The way to Dobromyl Castle stretches to the northwest of Dobromyl to a high and steep Slipa (Blind) mountain, which can be seen from the town clearly.

The fortress on the mountain appeared in the 15th century. In 1450, Mykola Herburt constructed a wooden castle here, which in 1497 was destroyed by Tatars. In 1566, Dobromyl received the Magdeburg Law and its owner Stanislaw Herburt built a new castle, this time it was made of stone.

Perhaps the most interesting page of Dobromyl Castle’s history is associated with the name of Jan Shchensniy Herburt (1567 -1616), who was the Polish political and literary figure, a royal secretary, a publisher and a journalist.

DOBROMYL CASTLE

DOBROMYL CASTLE

In 1611, Jan Shchensniy Herburt opened a printing house in the suburbs of Dobromyl, and later founded a monastery that survived to our days. He also initiated the last reconstruction of the castle, completed in 1614. The castle was enlarged and fortified. Its walls were now two meters high, and from the side of the court they were adjoined with residential and household buildings. The political activity of Jan Shchensniy Herburt brought Dobromyl to decline, and in 1622, his inheritors were forced to sell the town with the family castle to Konietspolskiy family. The Konietspolskiys had large possessions, so they did not pay much attention to Dobromyl Castle, and it began to decay. In 1722, after the division of Poland, Dobromyl became a part of the Austrian Empire. The new government ordered to take the castle down for building materials, but the main fortifications appeared to be so strong that peasants were unable to dismantle them. Therefore, they are still here today. The powerful entrance donjon tower, which served as a key defense element, is the best-preserved part of it.